Getting it right the first time

 

Growing bonsai takes time and attention to detail. At Palude bonsai studio, I mostly grow bonsai locally, from seed, cuttings and air-layering. At an early stage I want to set a good structure for the future development of the tree as a bonsai.

Of course, sometimes I do come across nursery material or even yamadori trees that are just too good ingore!

 

I set the stage for you to create beautiful bonsai right from the start.

 

 

Shari on the trunk of a mugo pine
Foliage pads on pine bonsai

starting from humble beginnings

I started growing bonsai in 2007, when I was 14 years old. Back then I barely knew what I was doing, which resulted in - you guessed it - a lot of dead trees. I quit the hobby after about 3 years, but my fascination for these small trees never subsided.


Around 2016, I started growing bonsai again. A couple of years older and wiser, I had more success in my endeavours in keeping my trees alive, and eventually they started thriving. I took to reading books on bonsai, learning online and going to exhibitions and workshops. Bonsai became my passion - again - and it's because of this passion I created this website.

 

Grown locally

 

The goal of this website is to share some of the things I've learned along the way, and things I'm still figuring out. Hopefully, I can inspire you in some way and vice versa. Bonsai is a collective and living art form, perfected by many people over the course of decades.

 

I treat every tree - even the smallest one - as a potential masterpiece. By using traditional techniques, I want to make sure that my trees start their lives as bonsai with the best features possible. When you propagate trees from seed, cuttings or layerings, you can enjoy this art form without spending a ton of money. The key is to make a good start.

Cherry blossom of a Prunus incisaa 'Kojou-no-mai"

In the near future, I'll be opening up a webshop where you can buy starters trees that I've grown myself. By offering locally sourced pre-bonsai with great potential, I want to make this living art form accessible to a broad audience.